Our 22 Covered Species

Bank Swallow

Scientific Name:
Riparia riparia

Status:
State-listed as threatened

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Burrowing Owl

Scientific Name:
Athene cunicularia

Status:
California species of special concern

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Cackling Goose

Scientific Name:
Branta hutchinsii leucopareia

Status:
Removed from the endangered species list in 2001

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White-Faced Ibis

Scientific Name:
Plegadis chihi

Status:
California species of special concern

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Western Spadefoot Toad

Scientific Name:
Spea hammondii

Status:
California species of special concern

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Northwestern Pond Turtle

Scientific Name:
Emys marmorata marmorata

Status:
California species of special concern

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Vernal Pool Tadpole Shrimp

Scientific Name:
Lepidurus packardi

Status:
Federally listed as endangered

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Vernal Pool Fairy Shrimp

Scientific Name:
Branchinecta lynchi

Status:
Federally listed as threatened

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Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle

Scientific Name:
Desmocerus californicus dimorphous

Status:
Federally listed as threatened

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Tricolored Blackbird

Scientific Name:
Agelaius tricolor

Status:
California species of special concern

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Swainson's Hawk

Scientific Name:
Buteo swainsoni

Status:
State-listed as Threatened

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Slender Orcutt Grass

Scientific Name:
Orcuttia tenuis

Status:
California Native; State and Federally listed as threatened

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Sanford's Arrowhead

Scientific Name:
Sagittaria sanfordii

Status:
California Native Plant Society List 1B.2

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Sacramento Orcutt Grass

Scientific Name:
Orcuttia viscida

Status:
California Native; State and Federally listed as endangered

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Midvalley Fairy Shrimp

Scientific Name:
Branchinecta mesovallensis

Status:
None

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Loggerhead Shrike

Scientific Name:
Lanius ludovicianus

Status:
California species of special concern

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Legenere

Scientific Name:
Legenere limosa

Status:
California Native Plant Society List 1B.1

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Giant Garter Snake

Scientific Name:
Thamnophis gigas

Status:
State and federally listed as threatened

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Delta Tule Pea

Scientific Name:
Lathyrus jepsonii var. jepsonii

Status:
California Native Plant Society List 1B.2

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California Tiger Salamander

Scientific Name:
Ambystoma californiense

Status:
State and federally listed as threatened

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Colusa Grass

Scientific Name:
Gratiola heterosepala

Status:
California Native; State-listed as endangered

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Boggs Lake Hedge-hyssop

Scientific Name:
Gratiola heterosepala

Status:
California Native; State-listed as endangered

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cattails_r The mission of The Natomas Basin Conservancy is to promote biological conservation along with economic development and the continuation of agriculture in the Natomas Basin. The Habitat Conservation Plan establishes a multi-species conservation program to mitigate the expected loss of habitat values and take of protected species that would result from urban development, operation irrigation and drainage systems, and rice farming. The goal of the Habitat Conservation Plan is to preserve, restore, and enhance habitat values in the Natomas Basin while allowing urban development to proceed according to local land use plans.

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Conservancy Articles

Public Notices

Covered Species Catalog

Covered SpeciesThe Conservancy, acting as Plan Operator for the Natomas Basin Habitat Conservation Plan (NBHCP), and the Metro Air Park Habitat Conservation Plan (MAPHCP), is charged with the conservation and protection of the 22 species “covered” by both Habitat Conservation Plans and Incidental Take Permits. These Covered Species are cataloged in a publication produced by the Conservancy. The Covered Species catalog is available at no cost as a free download. It is useful as an educational tool for field personnel, consultants, visitors, researchers and others with a general interest in the NBHCP and MAPHCP.

Conservancy Maps

LANDSAT ImageBase Map

Seasons of the Natomas Basin Conservancy

Seasons of the Natomas Basin Conservancy
The Conservancy’s Seasons of the Natomas Basin Conservancy booklet contains 26 photos by Gerry Tsuruda, noted landscape and nature photographer. View it online…

Conservancy Outreach

NNTMA Presentation In continuing efforts to expand public knowledge about the Conservancy and its work, Conservancy staff makes contact with various organizations on a regular basis.

Conservancy Executive Director, John Roberts recently appeared before the Board of Directors of the Natomas Central Mutual Water Company and the North Natomas Transportation Management Agency, as well as senior management with the Sacramento County Airport Systems, and the County of Sacramento.  A copy of the slide deck used with the presentation to the North Natomas Transportation Management Agency accompanies this article.

The Conservancy continues to reach out to area organizations, educators and elected leaders to build strong connections.  With the Natomas building moratorium now lifted, these connections are more important than ever for understanding and coordination.

Conservancy preserves recognized as potential fire break

Conservancy preserves recognized as potential fire breakSacramento Mayor Pro Tem Angelique Ashby, who represents the North Natomas area, was recently interviewed by the press and media while on the scene of a large grass fire in North Natomas. She drew attention to a nearby Natomas Basin Conservancy preserve, saying it acted as a sort of “green belt” and possible firebreak.

The fire, which took place on June 27, traveled up East Levee Road and North of West Elkhorn Boulevard. It was eventually extinguished by fire department helicopters and ground crews.

The Conservancy’s preserves along the northernmost Sacramento County boundary do in fact serve as a green belt in the general area where the June 27 fire took place. It’s good that in addition to the preserves’ many other benefits, their potential role in limiting the spread of large-scale grass fires are recognized as well.

Important new research on Giant garter snakes

A recent publication titled, “Defining population structure and genetic signatures of decline in the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas): implications for conserving threatened species within highly altered landscapes,” breaks some new ground on Giant garter snake populations in California. Authorized by Dustin Wood, Brian Halstead, Michael Casazza and Eric Hansen, the article notes Giant garter snake gene sharing taking place in the San Joaquin and Sacramento Valley Giant garter snake populations. It also notes that the Natomas Basin has among the highest genetic diversity of all studied populations. The article contains some fascinating charts, tables and graphs.

Download “Defining population structure and genetic signatures of decline in the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas)” (PDF, 1.4 MB)


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Featured Conservancy Photograph

March 2012 - Early Spring image of the Lucich North preserve with Sacramento skyline in background.


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